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Attached is the current version of the Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act (S. 1691), which was passed by the Senate on September 18, 2014.  

Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act

We have also attached a document which provides an English language breakdown of the bill, the hearings, and amendments.

Breakdown of S. 1691, Hearings, and Amendments

The bill now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration.

The National Border Patrol Council would like to thank Senators Tester and McCain for reaching across the aisle and sponsoring the bipartisan Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act. The BPAPRA was combined with the Cybersecurity Authorization today and it passed the Senate. It has now been sent to the House for consideration. We still have a lot of work to do. This is not a done deal yet.

We are grateful for the elected representatives and their staffs who put so much work into getting this through the Senate. Along with Senators Tester and McCain, we would also like to recognize and thank Senators Cornyn, Heitkamp, Ayotte and Flake for co-sponsorsing this important legislation.

To avoid any confusion or misinformation on the Border Patrol Pay Reform Act, we are providing the following document.  

Below is the Senate Bill that was proposed at markup. This is not the final version that passed the committee but it is the Amendment in the form of a substitute that was submitted. The final language that passed committee along with this has not been written and is not available in text.  The other change is a 2nd degree amendment submitted by Senator Tester that superseded the amendment submitted by Dr. Coburn. The 2nd degree amendment affects HQ, the academy, and admin positions but does not affect field agents.  When the text becomes available, we'll post it.

Document No. 1

As reported by Congressional Quarterly and GovTracker.com, the Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act was scheduled for mark-up on May 21, 2014; however, we found out that it was unexpectedly cancelled. It appears that the mark-up was cancelled due to the objections of a Senator on the committee that was scheduled to mark-up the bill. As you can see, in order to get a bill passed into law, it takes a huge effort involving a coalition of members of Congress to come together and agree; yet to kill a Bill, it can take just one member of Congress to ensure that the proposed legislation never sees the light of day. This has been a long and arduous process, but the NBPC is committed to doing everything it can to stabilize our pay and ensure that our efforts are not abandoned.

OT Lawsuit

If you are a border patrol agent who is a member of the NBPC union, click here for info to sign up for the overtime lawsuit.

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